• Beyond Copenhagen – the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

    by  • August 23, 2013 • Art, City Breaks, Copenhagen, Culture Breaks, Exhibitions • 0 Comments

    Situated in the small town of Humlebæk in North Zealand and offering a rather special panoramic view over the Øresund, Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art nestles just a 35-minute train ride outside of Copenhagen and is well worth a visit on any short break to the city, whether you’re a particular fan of modern art or simply just fancy a change of scenery. Indeed, the collective ensemble of art, nature and architecture makes for a unique and rewarding experience, especially the museum’s exterior offerings which include the tranquil lake garden and stunning sculpture park, the latter designed and laid out in such a way to complement to full potential the landscapes in which they reside.

    Opened in 1958 with more humble origins as a centre for Danish Modern Art, today the Louisiana is renowned as an international museum and boasts a considerable collection of modern art consisting of some 3,000 works, Scandinavia’s largest in fact. Leading on from the years following World War II, the collection includes a wealth of works by an A-list line up of artistic stars including Picasso, Dubuffet, David Hockney, Henry Moore and Andy Warhol amongst many others. Rather than focusing on a chronological overview of modern art, the Louisiana prefers instead to concentrate its portfolio on specific artists – Giacometti and Asger Jorn are two notable examples – and artistic genres – notably American Pop Art, European Nouveau Réalisme, German art of the 1980s and 1990s video art – into which it offers a deeper insight.

    Complementing the permanent collection, the Louisiana also presents a number of temporary modernist and contemporary art exhibitions throughout the year and currently on offer (until 29th September)  is an intriguing and somewhat unusual retrospective devoted to the work of Yoko Ono, often referred to as ‘the world’s most famous unknown artist’. Entitled ‘Half-a-Wind Show’, this collection of 100+ works is brought together to mark Yoko Ono’s 80th birthday and seeks to present her as a leading avant-garde artist and an influential pioneer through visual art, poetry, music, installation, performance art, film and events. Future temporary exhibitions are devoted to the Arctic (25th September 2013 until 2nd February 2014), as well as a comparative collection featuring the work of Asger Jorn and Jackson Pollock running from 15th November 2013 until 23rd February 2014.

    Open from Tuesday to Sunday from 11am to 10pm (until 6pm at weekends and on public holidays), the Louisiana offers a shop and café as well as a dedicated children’s wing and a programme of concerts. The museum is a 10-minute walk from Humlebæk train station and special discount tickets can be bought from all major DSB stations in Copenhagen’s metropolitan area. Entrance costs DKK 110 per adult and children up to the age of 18 are free!

    About

    With a French grandmother, childhood holidays on the continent and a degree in French and Spanish, a love of languages and travel has always been in my blood. Fresh from university with an unfettered enthusiasm to show off my linguistic ability and first-hand knowledge of the world beyond the UK, I entered the travel industry and, 16 years on, I’m still there! With several years spent in the luxury sector planning escorted holidays across Europe for the American market, followed by an even longer tenure designing short breaks with a difference in the must-see cities of Paris, Barcelona, Rome, Amsterdam, Madrid, Prague, Florence, Brussels, Venice, Salzburg, Milan, Krakow and Berlin (to name but a few), it’s fair to say that Europe is my passion! Today my travels have taken me far beyond the boundaries of Europe with so many destinations still to discover, yet the continent abounds in such a wealth of treasures – historical and architectural, cultural and musical, gastronomic, artistic and linguistic – that its appeal, for me, will be eternal.

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